AFTER NYNE X MONIKER ART FAIR: EXCLUSIVE ARTIST INTERVIEWS

Moniker Art Fair 2017 is literally just around the corner and it’s with much joy that we’re able to present four exclusive interviews with participating artists.

Don’t forget, as a media partner of the event for the past two years, we’re delighted to announce that we a running a 20% off day ticket for all visitors to this year’s Moniker Art Fair.

The event, which takes place on 5th – 8th October, will bring the globe’s most influential new-contemporary art galleries together with established names of the urban art scene.

ALLY MCINTYRE (JEALOUS GALLERY)

Describe your work to those unfamiliar with it.


My work is like taking multiple genres and putting them through a meat-grinder, coalescing into one entity on a large canvas. The work’s foundation is its bright colour, sometimes glitter, and spray paint. There always is an implied narrative with a subject, whether that is an animal, a human, or (in my new body of work) a plant.

What inspires you?


My day to day life experience tends to inspire me the most with my work, so it will naturally bleed into my work. If I am around something I like it usually ends up in my painting or If I am concerned or elated about a certain situation, that feeling ends up in my painting.
The process is intuitive and absorbs a lot from those moments.

Who have been your biggest influences?

I love the greats and tend to go through different phases of admiration. However, I have a postcard of Anthony Caro’s piece ‘Early One Morning’ which I cherish and take with me in every studio move.

What does it mean to you to exhibit your work with Moniker?



To show my work with Moniker Art Fair is an exciting opportunity. The art fair is always a vibrant and energetic space with talent around every corner. To be included in that space is a privilege.

What do you feel is Moniker’s role in the London and international art scene?

I feel Moniker’s role in the London and international art scene offers a freshness that can’t be duplicated. There is a nice contrast in the atmosphere of this fair to the others.

What do you feel have been the biggest developments in urban art in the past few years?

I think urban art as a form has become more commercialized and utilized as an acceptable medium. I think social media has given a lot of artists a wider platform beyond their city or local community to engage and collaborate.

What can the public expect to see from your work at Moniker?

The public can expect to see colour and new subject matter.

What are you planning next?


I am working towards my solo show ‘Decaf Honey’ on 2nd November with Jealous Gallery, 53 Curtain Road, London, EC2A 3PT.

MASON STORM (RELOAD GALLERY)

Describe your work to those unfamiliar with it.

That’s quite a difficult thing to do. I generally paint what I would like to hang on my own walls, whether that’s something modern such as my portrait of Jay Z with two New York Cops, or a 14th Century Old Master. However I suppose my work is recognised by the twist I put on it, whether that’s the Virgin Mary with a tattoo or a cute Norman Rockwell with a less than savoury background.
I was told recently by a ‘serious’ art dealer and agent that I have so many styles of work it’s hard for a collector to become engaged with me as an artist as they like the idea of being able to walk into any gallery or art fair and instantly spot a piece and say “that’s a Mason Storm”.
I could do that formulaic way of painting but it would bore me to tears, so if that has an effect on my sales then so be it, I work for me, and as for buyers they are always out there, just got to find them. People often buy into me as a person and that is what it’s about for me.

What inspires you?

I have an eclectic taste and I find inspiration in so many different things, everything from religious imagery to fetish and biker culture. I am a voracious collector of books and magazines, postcards, leaflets and any image that takes my fancy. I love graphic novels, comics, cartoons (Family Guy keeps me awake far too late) along with a large collection of art books on every style imaginable. I can spend a day at a Cosplay expo and come away with hundreds of ideas for a piece of work, or spend the next day in the National Gallery and come away equally inspired. I think as an artist it my job to see the things others maybe can’t and make that flesh in one of my paintings.

I am fascinated by faces and the human form. It’s basically a cliché but I’m inspired by life itself, and people. Everyone has a story to tell and often its written over their face which is probably why I’m best known as a portrait artist, equally it’s the persons story that grabs me and I feel I want to record a piece of their history in canvas.

Who have been your biggest influences?

That’s a huge list, however the person who first inspired me in the pursuit of art is Alan Clayden. He was the tutor at a local Youth Centre, where I spent a lot of my formative years, as a person and an artist, he also created the Islington Arts Factory along with his life Pauline. He was a fabulous artist in his own right and sadly no longer with us. His approach to life and art was “of course you can just give it a go” At one point he even convinced myself and a friend to audition for a contemporary dance show at Saddlers Wells, we actually got in! His contribution to art in the UK is huge, everyone who came into contact with him was inspired to create.

As for artists who have influenced me there’s quite a list, in no particular order.
Duane Hanson, Warhol, Caravaggio, Van Gogh, Hirst, Murakami, Giacometti, Van Dyck, Rembrandt, Basquiat, Helmut Newton, Wei Wei, Koons, Hockney, Dali, Magritte, Rauschenberg, de kooning, Pollock, Grayson Perry et al. There are so many it would take up a book in itself.

What does it mean to you to exhibit your work with Moniker?

Moniker is a great fair and it’s always fun to show there alongside so many other great artists. It’s a privilege to be able to show anywhere, some artists believe it’s their god given right to be shown. We all think we are the world’s best thing but in reality every gallery has had hundreds ‘next big thing’ through their doors, so yes for me showing at an event like Moniker is a treat. I have shown all over the world but showing in your home town is always a great, the travel is minimal and you know the best pubs!

I have always enjoyed Moniker as a fair, long before I started showing I was a visitor and every time I have been there I have been impressed by the depth of talent, also Moniker is a very friendly fair always a bonus!

What do you feel is Moniker’s role in the London and international art scene?

I believe Moniker fits right in the middle of what’s going on with the art fairs both domestically and internationally. There are the amateur fairs that have go, and there are the big fairs like Frieze that cater for the absolute top end. Moniker is at a level that makes art and the buying of art accessible to the wider public. Art fairs can be intimidating but Moniker is nothing like that, it takes the mystery out of art because it’s so relaxed and because the galleries exhibiting know their markets and the prices are attainable. I have spoken with people who save up for the whole year to have a ‘splurge’ at Moniker, it’s that kind of fair and that a great thing!

What do you feel have been the biggest developments in urban art in the past few years

Commodification! I don’t mean that as a negative, far from it. The big change I have seen is the crossover that urban art has made into the higher end galleries and the rise in prices for the artists doing the work. I have seen artists who I gave a platform to only five or six years ago whose work is now achieving impressive prices. I think the assent of urban art is continuing and very soon we will see its top exponents making prices on a par with a number of today’s contemporary artists.

What can the public expect to see from your work at Moniker?

Last year I did a lot of printed and sculptural works as a break from painting but this year I’m going back to my fine art roots and showing my oil paintings. My centrepiece image is ‘The Death of a Fisherman’ – a modern take on Caravaggio’s Crucifixion of St. Peter taken from a stunning photo by photographer Pedro Aguliar. It’s my third painting from one of Pedro’s photos and without doubt one of the best pieces I have done to date, I’m very proud of it. I will also be showing a few of my favourite earlier works, something for everyone.

What are you planning next?

I’m very excited to be involved in launching a new company, Asylum Artist Management with two partners, one of whom owns Reload Gallery in Leamington Spa. We both have a lot of experience in the industry and our third partner is a lawyer so we have it all covered!

We will be signing and representing new and mid-career artists, looking after their interests and promoting them and their work. The industry is a minefield and so many new artists, great talents get taken advantage of or get bad representation. We want to redress that balance, we want our clients to be recognised as for what they are, creative superstars! We plan to do something different in how we market and promote them. They say art is the new rock and roll and we want our artists to be the chart toppers!
I am also consulting on a documentary about forgery in the urban art world, and in between that I have a million and one paintings I need to get out of my head and on to canvas, so busy busy busy!

 

EELUS (LAWRENCE ALKIN GALLERY)

Describe your work to those unfamiliar with it.

I’m primarily a stencil artist whose work revolves around contrasting themes and visual elements. I like to mix humour with the macabre, light with dark, bright bursts of colour against grey skies. I’m fascinated with finding the balance between all these opposing forces and how their entanglement is necessary for them to exist.

My work often features dark, monochromatic and sometimes-melancholic women who stylistically are quite rough and grainy. I do this using spray cans to create textured shading. They’re usually interacting in some way with quite flat, abstract, graphic elements in bold bright colours. Each piece is a puzzle, a balancing act. Detail against negative space, light with dark, the familiar with the fantastic.

What inspires you?

Chuck Close famously said, ‘inspiration is for amateurs, the rest of us just show up and get to work’ and I think that’s true. I turn up to the studio every day and process and pick through all the ideas I’ve stolen from all over the place. I try to read as much as I can and borrow ideas from all kinds of books, both fiction and non-fiction. I love horror and science fiction, books on history, science, the occult, mythology and magic. I watch a lot of films and make notes on any visual cues I find interesting.

I love vintage book covers and old film posters, especially horror and those from Eastern Europe. I love all forms of art, some favourites: Hieronymus Bosch, The Chapman Brothers, Henry Fuseli, Victor Mann, Gustav Klimt, Audrey Beardsley, Arnold Böcklin, Tim Walker, Banksy, and Nicola Samori.

I walk my dog at the start and end of every work day and let my mind wander with all the things it’s taken in, let it play and combine separate elements to create strange new things. I always carry a notebook to scribble down anything I think of. I take photos of things I see on the street, anything from interesting colour combinations on vintage dresses to the patterns on street grids, the wallpaper in the pub, interesting junk in old shops in and around Brighton. All of this along with things I find online and on social media all gets thrown in a big folder on my computer and that keeps my ‘inspiration’ larder well stocked.

Basically, I try to be interested in as much as possible, from as many different areas as possible. For me personally, the weirder the better.

Who have been your biggest influences?

When I was a kid I loved all the old Ray Harryhausen films, and my bedroom walls were lined with Frank Frazetta and H.R Giger posters. I still love all that stuff; it’s my roots and made me want to be a visual creative of some kind.

After moving to London in 2000 and being introduced to street art, Banksy in particular, things fell into place for me and stencil art became a medium I instantly understood. I don’t have any formal art training but I knew that was something I could do, using my background in graphic design.

What does it mean to you to exhibit your work with Moniker?

It means a lot and I feel incredibly lucky. The event generally has a great selection of artists and galleries and to exhibit there for a second time amongst friends and peers whose work I admire is a real honour.

What do you feel is Moniker’s role in the London and international art scene?

I’ve always felt there’s a real mixture of work at the show and it introduces people to all kinds of brilliant madness, from lesser known artists as well as bigger names. It’s important for London to host an art fair like Moniker that represents the urban/street/graffiti side of the art world as there’s not much else over here that does, certainly not to the high level that Moniker is now known for.

What do you feel have been the biggest developments in urban art in the past few years?

Well, I feel like everything these days needs to be the size of a tower block to be noticed or discussed. Large-scale muralism has replaced intimate street art in a lot of ways and I think that’s kind of a shame.

What can the public expect to see from your work at Moniker?

I’ll be releasing a very limited 18 colour screen print edition at Moniker in conjunction with my solo show ‘Dance Boldly Through The Storm’ opening on 12th October at Lawrence Alkin Gallery. The print will be available from the Lawrence Alkin Gallery stand, but there are only 15, so if you’d like one, best get there early.

What are you planning next?

I’m working on my next solo show opens at Lawrence Alkin Gallery. It will have a collection of new paintings on canvas and wood as well as a new print edition and a few 3D projects which I’ve been having a lot of fun with; I’ll definitely be exploring that medium more in the future. I’ll also be returning to more paper-cut work towards the end of the year and into 2018, as it’s been a while since I put time into that.

My partner and I had our first child about four months ago so she’s the number one project at the moment. I’ll be taking some time off in the new year to stay home and look after her. Outside of that, more work, more painting, the odd print release here and there, whatever takes my fancy from day-to-day really. There are all kinds of projects planned for down the line, but I can’t give anything away at the moment. You’ll just have to stay tuned.

THE TINKER BROTHERS (PUBLIC HOUSE OF ART)

Describe your work to those unfamiliar with it.

You can get a five-year-old to explain our work. And he’ll probably do a better job than we do. Our work is simple, bold and accessible. By using words and pop icons like Mickey Mouse and Felix the Cat we express the rebel, poet and joker within, not afraid to say how we really feel. About the troubles of this world, its beauty and our place in it. About our dreams and potential, our heartfelt and suffering. About love. Each artwork is a reminder to ourselves that there is no point in playing small, in being mediocre. We all have a fire within, and it’s about time we let it burn.

What inspires you?

We are inspired by people who are all-in, people that believe there are no shortcuts and don’t take “no” for an answer. The dreamers, the lovers, the rebels. The ones who go about their days making trouble. The poets, the ones who’s nights flame with fire. The ones who are brutally honest, painfully sincere—the children of this world. The ones who are not afraid to raise their voice to tell the truth. The people who don’t go about asking what the world needs, but go about doing what makes them come alive, because that’s what this world needs—people who have come alive.


Who have been your biggest influences?

Our biggest influences, what has shaped the character of the Tinker Brothers, started with music. Love songs and soul, classical and rap, soundtracks and pop—from Michael Jackson to Kanye West. And it continues with movies – lifetimes lived in 2 hours. Stories that give you goosebumps, stories that inspire bold dreams and raise the questions that keep you up at night. Love stories, stories of heroes and villains. Stories that make your heart glow and grow a little larger.

What does it mean to you to exhibit your work with Moniker?

Finally. After 5 years of burning bridges, the hundreds of rejections, the setbacks and hitting rock bottom, giving up everything for the dream of being among the most influential artists of our time; this is the stage we have been dreaming of. And considering the fact that Moniker Art Fair champions emerging talent, being one of the most exciting contemporary art fairs, we are somewhat humbled to be exhibited among some of the globe’s most influential urban artists.

What do you feel is Moniker’s role in the London and international art scene?

We feel Monikers role is to create a fresh and groundbreaking platform for raw diamonds of the urban, contemporary and street art scene to be discovered by the public and collectors all over the world. To us, Moniker bridges the gap between the dream of becoming a successful living artist and the reality of being one.

What do you feel have been the biggest developments in urban art in the past few years?

We feel urban art is moving out of the shadows into the light. Meaning, urban art is making its rise from dark alleys and bus stations into the public eye. Somehow, urban art brings something to the table that is hard to put into words. Perhaps, it’s because the rules are continuously being broken and there is always this freshness, this electricity in the air. It’s buzzing, and it’s truly exciting to be part of a movement with such potential.

What can the public expect to see from your work at Moniker?

With titles like “Fuck Who Doesn’t Like This Painting”, “Pay for Soup. Build a Fort. Set That on Fire”, “Paradise Falls”, “Any Regrets”, “Revenge? Nah, I’m Too Lazy. I’m Just Gonna Sit Here and Let Karma Fuck You Up”, “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” and “Friday, 3:02 PM”; they get to see a unique body of work exclusive for the Public House of Art, a glimpse of looking at the world through the eyes of the Tinker Brothers.

What are you planning next?

Apart from taking the art world by storm and living the vision of being centenarians, drinking whiskey, making art and watching the sunset from our rocking chairs in Los Angeles, we are currently working on and will soon be releasing and exhibiting a new body of work that will usher in a new era for the Tinker Brothers. Invisibility is a superpower

Share This Post
Share on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter