Nine Must-See Exhibitions

Here’s our selection of exhibitions not to miss this week. To get listed email newsdesk@afternyne.com

POSTPONED FUTURES
GRAD (Gallery for Russian and Eastern European Arts and Design)
UNTIL 24 JUNE 2017

Curated by NIKITA KADAN

Postponed Futures displays works by the most prolific artists of the Ukrainian avant-garde, three active contemporary artists and one writer. It attempts to view the avant-garde through contemporary art – and, in turn, contemporary art through the avant-garde.

This exhibition is based on the firm belief that, in telling the history of the arts, one must also tell the history of society. As a result, this exhibition is also about Ukraine; the Ukraine of today and of a century ago.

It is not the aim of this exhibition to give a detailed academic overview of the ‘Ukrainian avant-garde’. The artists and the curator are certain that the definition of Ukrainian avant-garde (derived from the broader ‘Russian avant-garde’ which unites any avant-garde art practices on the territories of the former Russian Empire or Soviet republics) is totally justified. Nevertheless, the practices of this particular strand of the avant-garde require both greater visibility and a diversification of responses to it, including the interpretations of contemporary artists. It will, perhaps, take a significant amount of time to supplement the lack of serious academic publications and exhibitions on the subject of the Ukrainian avant-garde – but we must begin with what we have.

PSYCHE-SOMA
FLORIAN EYMANN
LAWRENCE ALKIN GALLERY
UNTIL JUNE 3rd

Lawrence Alkin Gallery is excited to present the work of French artist Florian Eymann, who is exhibiting in London for the first time this month. His new solo show, titled ‘Psyche-Soma’ features 23 original artworks in oil and watercolour on paper and canvas.

Creating alluring portraiture inspired by the masters, Eymann’s interpretations feature purposeful distortions, encouraging the audience to think about the relationship between the mind and the body.

“I want the audience to think of classical portraits initially, then notice my distortions and make their own interpretations. The viewer must delve into their own psyche to fill in the gaps and create each piece as a whole.” Eymann

As well as the distortion and deformation of classical tropes, Eymann’s work contains significant contrasts between dark and light. The dark tones are symbolic of the human psyche, which in contrast to the body, cannot be physically seen. Lighter tones represent what we see on the surface, including the body and the outward persona. Eymann brings the light and dark together to recognise the two aspects of an individual working together. He explains:

“Within society I feel there is an overall lack of emphasis on understanding the psyche and our more complex emotions. People often shut away feelings as a defence mechanism, but this causes bigger conflict within the body. I want my work to unlock doors in the viewer’s mind, whether this evokes a positive or negative reaction depends on the individual, but the most important thing is that the work incites emotion.”

GIRLS GIRLS GIRLS
JEALOUS GALLERY & PRINT STUDIO
UNTIL JUNE 18th

Running from 17th May – 18th June 2017, ‘Girls Girls Girls’ group show is exclusive to Jealous North and features an array of screenprinted and original works from each artist, which includes Ceal Warnants, Jess Wilson, Magda Archer, Sadie Hennessy, Sarai Vardi, and Shuby.

Exhibiting a series of multi-disciplinary works, ‘Girls Girls Girls’ will demonstrate the kitsch, subversive, humourous, dark and absurd, as created by a small selection of Jealous female artists, all of whom take a different approach to producing and making art, but have printmaking form a component of their practice.

TERENCE COVENTRY
AGAINST THE TIDE
PANGOLIN LONDON
UNTIL JUNE 17th

Following on from his highly successful solo exhibition Birds and Beasts in 2014, sculptor Terence Coventry returns with an exciting body of new work.

ICONS OF TIME: MEMORIES OF THE TSUNAMI THAT STRUCK JAPAN
THE FITZROVIA CHAPEL
UNTIL MAY 21st

The Japanese photographer Tomohiro Muda’s first UK exhibition commemorates six years since Japan’s northeastern coast was hit by a powerful earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Icons of Time will be shown at the recently restored and reopened Fitzrovia Chapel, a stunning Grade II* listed building which was formerly the chapel for the old Middlesex Hospital. The exhibition will also form a satellite event for Photo London fair, which runs at Somerset House 17 – 21 May and be part of Fitzrovia Photo London Discovery Night, when the par- ticipating galleries in the fair will open til 8.30pm.

PRESENT IMPERFECT: DISORDERLY APPAREL RECONFIGURED
FASHION SPACE GALLERY
UNTIL AUG 4th

Disorderly apparel describes garments that are badly damaged, utterly worn-out or made from textiles that have perished over time. The items exhibited in Present Imperfect are prized for these very qualities. However, such apparel can be left overlooked or suppressed, lie dormant or languish in museum stores, and are rarely exhibited. Present Imperfect seeks to reassert these seemingly awkward items of dress and render them as compelling.

YIGAL OZERI
OPERA GALLERY
UNTIL MAY 25TH

Highlighting classical feminine beauty with impossibly realistic lighting, dreamy setting and joyous colour tones, Yigal OZERI’s art exudes sensuality into fleeting moments of women interacting with their natural and urban surroundings.

ARS MORIENDI
ALEXANDER JAMES AND GAIL OLDING
DELLASPOSA
UNTIL MAY 31st

The exhibition delves into the art of dying and our fascination with momento mori in art. Featuring works from Alexander James’s Vanitas series on A Beautiful Announcement of Death. In addition, the show features a large-scale sculpture, Razzle Dazzle, and a site-specific installation Each Day, by British sculptor and photographer Gail Olding.

DAWIT ABEBE
KRISTIN HJELLEGJERDE GALLERY
UNTIL JUNE 3rd

In Ethiopian artist Dawit Abebe’s third solo exhibition at the gallery, he investigates the impact of man’s actions vis-à-vis nature. Quo Vadis? (8th of May – 3rd of June 2017), at Kristin Hjellegjerde Gallery, presents a new body of work, building on Abebe’s signature collage painting investigations of the devastating effects of urbanisation and industrial ‘progress’.

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